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Focus the objectives of Home Rule Movement and its major contributions to the freedom struggle of India. Why did the movement fade out by 1919? Explain.

Topic: The Freedom Struggle — its various stages and important contributors/contributions from different parts of the country.

2.  Focus the objectives of Home Rule Movement and its major contributions to the freedom struggle of India. Why did the movement fade out by 1919? Explain. (250 words)

Reference: Modern Indian history by Bipin Chandra

Why the question:

The question is premised on the theme of Home Rule Movement and its contributions to Indian freedom struggle.

Key Demand of the question:

Explain the significance and relevance of the Home rule movement of 1919; also explain why the movement faded out soon.

Directive:

Explain – Clarify the topic by giving a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Give a brief introduction of the Home Rule Movement. The Indian Home Rule movement was a movement in British India on the lines of Irish Home Rule movement and other home rule movements.

Body:

Enumerate its major objectives and contributions to India’s freedom struggle.

Between the years 1916 and 1918, the Indian independence movement witnessed the growth and spread of the home rule movement spearheaded by leaders like Bal Gangadhar Tilak and Annie Besant. The aim of the home rule movement was the attainment of home rule or a dominion status for India under the British Empire along the lines of countries like Canada and Australia. This movement was carried out through the two home rule leagues.

Discuss in detail the objectives of the movement, activities associated with it. Then the significance of it.

Then move on to discuss the reasons that led to its decline.

Conclusion:

Conclude that the movement was not a mass movement. It was restricted to educated people and college students. The leagues did not find a lot of support among Muslims, Anglo-Indians and non-Brahmins from Southern India as they thought home rule would mean a rule of the upper caste Hindu majority. Many of the moderates were satisfied with the government’s assurance of reforms (as preluded in the Montague Declaration). They did not take the movement further.