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Constitutional Morality necessitates a co-existence of freedom and self- imposed restraint. Examine.

Topic:  Indian Constitution– historical underpinnings, evolution, features, amendments, significant provisions and basic structure.

 1. Constitutional Morality necessitates a co-existence of freedom and self- imposed restraint. Examine.  (250 words)

The Hindu

Why this question:

On the occasion of Constitution Day, at a joint sitting of Parliament to mark the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the Constitution, President Ram Nath Kovind, (quoting B.R. Ambedkar) made a significant observation that all three organs of the state, persons occupying constitutional posts, civil society members, and citizens should abide by ‘constitutional morality’.

Key demand of the question:

Explain what constitutional morality is and discuss the significance of the necessary coexistence freedom and self-restraint.

Directive:

Examine – When asked to ‘Examine’, we must look into the topic (content words) in detail, inspect it, investigate it and establish the key facts and issues related to the topic in question. While doing so we should explain why these facts and issues are important and their implications.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Define what you understand by constitutional morality.

Body:

Recently, concerns are increasingly being voiced by different segments of people regarding violations of the Constitution by those in authority; about the future of democracy and democratic traditions are growing across the world.

Explain that in quite a few democracies, one can also perceive a decrease in democratic freedoms and a trend in favour of illiberal populism. India was hitherto perceived to be an exception to this, being protected by safeguards found in its Constitution — the product of a Constituent Assembly that consisted of not only the best legal minds, but also of compassionate individuals who espoused the finest human values.

Conclusion:

Conclude by highlighting the challenges and suggest that such policies and acts by the govt. are portents of danger, and call for a great deal of introspection. They merit a calibrated response.