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SECURE SYNOPSIS: 20 AUGUST 2019


SECURE SYNOPSIS: 20 AUGUST 2019


NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same time gives you extra points in the form of background information.


Topic:  Women and associated issues, Welfare schemes for vulnerable sections of the population by the Centre and States and the performance of these schemes; mechanisms, laws, institutions and Bodies constituted for the protection and betterment of these vulnerable sections.

1) As India celebrates its 73rd year of independence, do women continue their struggle to be free in India? Discuss in the context of public safety for women.(250 words)

Livemint

Why this question:

The question is based on the issue of public safety witnessed by the women in India.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must discuss the causes and consequences and the concerns of public safety that hinder growth and development of women in India.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Discuss struggle women have gone through in the country historically.

Body:

Discuss why to engage with the world and truly live their lives, Indian women want the rule of law to deliver safety.

What is public safety? Why is it necessary? 

What are the consequences of lack of public safety? – Women are far more likely to experience verbal and physical harassment, stalking, molestation, assault, sexual assault and rape compared to men. While India has a high incidence of violence and sexual assault within the household, much of this plays out in public spaces.

Explain in what way safety factor often creates boundaries to women and shackles their freedom.

Conclusion:

Conclude with solutions to address the problems.

Introduction:

The UN has defined violence against women very broadly to include such issues as interpersonal violence in the home, violence against women in public space, trafficking, violence in post-conflict situations and harmful gender-based practices (UN2006).

Body:

Public safety scenario for women in India:

  • While India has a high incidence of violence and sexual assault within the household, much of this plays out in public spaces.
  • On streets, in buses, schools, offices and parks, and even police stations and hospitals.
  • Sexual harassment and violence against women are so rampant that society does not even consider stalking or groping or verbal harassment to be serious problems.
  • In her study of street harassment in Delhi, Girija Borker at the World Bank found that women are willing to choose a lower-quality college for a travel route that is perceived to be safer.
  • Alternatively, women are willing to spend, relative to men, an additional 40 minutes on travel time daily or an additional ₹18,800 per year, for a safer route.
  • These women are among the most privileged, gaining a college education in a large metropolis. For the less privileged, these options don’t exist.
  • Rural women also need to bear in mind the security of their workspace in the fields and the areas they use for access to water or open defecation.

Consequences of poor public safety:

  • Some are asked to stop going to school when they hit puberty, and their choice set becomes extremely small.
  • Others still are asked to change their school based on proximity to home, or safe travel routes, instead of educational outcomes. E
  • Even where women are allowed to go to college, it must be near their home, during safe hours, and should preferably be all-girls’ colleges.
  • Even older women drop out of the workforce just to keep their daughters safe at home until they are married.
  • Women’s spaces, and therefore actions, are predefined, with little room for improvisation or spontaneity.
  • Women with financial means are constantly chaperoned, watched and guarded as they go to school or work, or to socialize.
  • For those who are less economically and socially privileged, who cannot afford 24-hour protection from family and staff, it usually means a world restricted to a small physical and social circle.
  • For the least privileged, it means taking a risk with their physical safety and well-being while attempting to complete the most ordinary of tasks.
  • Because of this, women watch their world shrink. Or in many cases, have never known an un-shrunk world.

 

Measures needed:

  • Police vigils should be made mandatory at places. The presence of police should be increased at places like schools, colleges, malls and other places were crowd gathers
  • Authorities should ensure that all the public places are lit properly
  • The authorities should ensure that women travel safely whether it’s the trains, buses or the metro rails.
  • The authorities should ensure the cameras are installed at all key places which will help the manual management of law and order a great deal.
  • The autos which still are a good and cheap source to commute don’t have GPS system installed. Authorities should ensure this.
  • A victim should be able to File FIR online, but despite recommendations, FIRs are still filed in conventional ways where the victim is made to wait for hours

Conclusion:

Rule of law and public law enforcement is important for society at large, but has the most impact on women. For women, safety is instrumental to gaining freedom. Even freedom is instrumental. Women want freedom to become the women they want to become.


Topic: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.Effects of liberalization on the economy, changes in industrial policy and their effects on industrial growth.

2) The automobile sector of the country is in the news as it is experiencing prolonged negative growth. What are the reasons? Why are jobs being lost? And how can the government help? Discuss. (250 words)

The hindu

Why this question:

The article captures the sudden slump being witnessed in the automobile industry in the country.

Key demand of the question:

Explain the causes for the slump in the automobile sector, the loss of jobs that is being witnessed and what the government needs to do to overcome the challenges and the concerns.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Discuss the current situation of automobile industry in the country.

Body:

Quote data from the article indicating the slowdown in the markets, explain the causative factors – global and domestic economic slowdown, lack of will in people to buy owing to policy changes in the tax regime, electric vehicles, BS VI reforms etc.

Explain what needs to be done by the government like – 

A reduction in GST to 18% from the current rate of 28% will help in an immediate price reduction.

Measures to handle the NBFC crisis will help infuse the much-needed liquidity into the system ahead of the coming festive season.

Clarity on policy for electric vehicles and introduction of vehicle scrappage policy will also boost demand for new vehicles.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way ahead.

Introduction:

The Indian automobile industry, the world’s fourth-largest, has finally embraced a slowdown after a near-decade of high growth. The Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) announced that in July, the sale of vehicles across categories in the country slumped 18.71% to about 18.25 lakh units, down from about 22.45 lakh units, a year ago in the same month. This has been the steepest fall in nearly 19 years.

Body:

With the industry failing to arrest the downturn that started almost a year ago, despite deep discounts and new model launches, it has been forced to undertake production cuts.

Reasons for the slump in sales:

  • Domestic passenger vehicle sales declined for the first time after nine months in July 2018.
  • In July 2017, vehicle sales spiked due to the benefits extended by the rollout of the Goods and Services Tax (GST).
  • However, demand failed to pick up in August and September, after the floods in Kerala and heavy rainfall in several other States.
  • In the ensuing months, consumer sentiment remained subdued as the total cost of vehicle ownership went up largely due to an increase in fuel prices, higher interest rates and a hike in vehicle insurance costs.
  • In such an environment, the festive season too failed to boost demand, leading to a huge inventory pile-up with dealers.
  • To add to this, the IL&FS crisis late last year led to a severe liquidity crunch, almost drying up credit for dealers and customers.
  • Nearly half the vehicles sold in rural markets — a segment that has been witnessing a higher growth rate in comparison to urban markets — are financed by non-banking financial companies (NBFCs).
  • Being stuck with higher inventory due to a lacklustre festive season, dealers too needed more working capital.
  • There is also a possibility that some customers are waiting to buy the latest Bharat Stage (BS)-VI emission standard compliant vehicles or are waiting for more incentives from vehicle makers who will be looking to sell off their BS-IV compliant stocks before the April 1, 2020 deadline.

Reasons for Jobs loss:

  • The automobile sector is one of the largest employers in the country, employing about 37 million people, directly and indirectly.
  • The prolonged demand slowdown has triggered production as well as job cuts in the sector.
  • According to the latest figures that are available, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have removed about 15,000 temporary workers in the past two to three months.
  • A lack of working capital amid tepid demand has led to closure of nearly 300 dealerships across the country.
  • This has led to over two lakh people losing their jobs, according to the Federation of Automobile Dealers Associations (FADA), the apex national body of automobile retail industry engaged in the sale, service and spares of two- and three-wheelers, passenger cars, utility vehicles, commercial vehicles (including buses and trucks) and tractors.
  • Separately, the Automotive Component Manufacturers Association of India (ACMA) warned in July that 10 lakh jobs were at risk and urgent action was needed to bring the industry back on track.

Measures needed:

  • The industry’s demands include a reduction in GST to 18% from the current rate of 28%, which will help in an immediate price reduction. It could kick-start demand in the short term, particularly ahead of the coming festive season.
  • Besides, it has sought measures to handle the NBFC crisis to infuse liquidity into the system
  • clarity on policy for electric vehicles
  • Introduction of vehicle scrappage policy, which will also boost demand for new vehicles.
  • Limit has to be imposed on state government to levy road tax.
  • Saving rate has to be improved as long term measure which raises the purchasing power.
  • Nudge to improve exports.

Conclusion:

The automobile sector is one of the few success stories that India has and perhaps the only one in manufacturing. If half the manufacturing GDP of the country is in doldrums and declining sales of cars, two wheelers and trucks will result in lower GST collections, the government’s already precarious fiscal math could worsen further in 2019-20. Reviving the automobile sector should, therefore, become one of the top priorities of the government.


Topic: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

3) Unless we sight migrant workers as a dynamic part of a changing India, the problems concerning Urbanization will remain unaddressed. Comment.(250 words)

Livemint

Why this question: 

The article presents the case study of migrant issue in the country and in what way it is associated with the problems of urbanisation.

Demand of the question:

Explain the interrelationship that exists between the migrants and the urbanization in the country.

Directive word: 

Commenthere we have to express our knowledge and understanding of the issue and form an overall opinion thereupon.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction

State data for migrants from the article.

Body

Explain briefly the current trends of migration in India and in what way it is impacting the urban landscape

Discuss the issues posed by migrants, also explain why they face vulnerabilities and thus fail to contribute productively and act as a counterproductive mechanism to the urban areas.

Explain what needs to be done to ensure migrants contribute to the productivity, suggest solutions.

Conclusion 

Conclude with suitable solutions to the problems.

Introduction:

Migration is defined as the movement of people from one place to another across the political boundaries- national (internal) or international. It is an integral part and an important factor in redistributing the population over time and space. Migrants who move within the boundaries of their own country are known as internal migrants.

Body:

Migration trends:

  • Census 2011 says 45 million Indians moved outside their district of birth for work opportunities—be it employment or business.
  • Of the 640 districts in 2011, just 5 accounted for 15% of all migrants who moved in for employment opportunities.
  • Each was home to more than a million migrants who moved there for work—Thane (1.6 million), Bangalore (1.5 million), Mumbai Suburban (1.3 million), Pune (1.2 million) and Surat (1 million).
  • In terms of inflows, there are only 57 districts across India where more than 20% of migrants moved for work reasons. These are the districts that hold the promise of employment opportunities.
  • Across India, 25% of migrants who changed states did so for work. Only 8% of intra-state migrations were for work and employment.

Urbanization challenges encountered by migrant workers:

  • Employment in informal economy: Migrants dominate the urban informal economy which is marked by high poverty and vulnerabilities. In an unorganized and chaotic labour market, migrant workers regularly face conflicts and disputes at worksites. The common issues they face are non-payment of wages, physical abuse, accidents and even death at work.
  • Issue of Identification documents: Proving their identity is one of the core issues faced by poor migrant labourers at destination areas. The basic problem of establishing identity results in a loss of access to entitlements and social services, such as subsidized food, fuel, health services, or education that are meant for the economically vulnerable sections of the population.
  • Housing: Lack of affordable housing in Indian cities force migrants to live in slums. Many seasonal migrants are not even able to afford rents in slums force them to live at their workplaces (such as construction sites and hotel dining rooms), shop pavements, or in open areas in the city
  • Financial Access: Migrant workers have limited access to formal financial services and remain unbanked
  • Access to healthcare: Migrant workers have poor access to health services, which results in very poor occupational health.
  • Education of children: UNESCO’s 2019 Global Education Monitoring Report (GEM Report) shows that children left behind by migrating parents and seasonal migrants face fewer educational opportunities overall. According to the report, 80% of migrant children across seven Indian cities did not have access to education near worksites. Among youth aged 15 to 19 who have grown up in a rural household with a seasonal migrant, 28% were identified as illiterate or had an incomplete primary education.
  • Social exclusion: There is a growing hostility of urban governments, as well as middle-class citizens, towards the urban poor, especially migrants to the cities.
  • Political exclusion: Migrant workers are deprived of many opportunities to exercise their political rights. A 2011 study pointed out that 22% of seasonal migrant workers in India did not possess voter IDs or have their names in the voter list.
  • At policy level the major challenge is to formulate migration policies which must be linked with employment and social services, to enhance the well-being of the migrant living in urban area.

Measures to improve the delivery of services to migrant worker:

  • There is an urgent need to develop a coherent legal and policy framework on migration. Policy can have two dimensions: reducing distress-induced migration and address conditions of work, terms of employment and access to basic necessities.
  • Development strategies in backward rural areas should be strengthened to provide sustainable livelihood opportunities, food security programmes and creating opportunities for access to credit.
  • Further, focus should be given on improving rural infrastructure- health, education and connectivity.
  • A concerted national strategy that ensures access to entitlements and basic work conditions is necessary to address the plight of migrant workers.
  • Internal migrants should be able to access legal aid and counselling to protect them from work and wage-related malpractice, and to ensure they have access to grievance handling and dispute resolution mechanisms.
  • There is an urgent need to ensure that internal migrants are issued with a universally recognised and portable proof of identity that can form the basis on which to claim other socio-economic entitlements anywhere in the country.
  • Overall processes of governance need to be democratized in order to include internal migrants in decision making processes and planning
  • Education provisions should be sufficiently flexible to ensure that mobile populations are not left out.
  • Initiatives should be taken to foster social inclusion of migrants and reduce discrimination.

Way forward:   

  • A national policy on migration should facilitate the integration of migrants into the local urban fabric, and building city plans with a regular migration forecast assumed.
  • Lowering the cost of migration, along with eliminating discrimination against migrants, while protecting their rights will help raise development across the board.
  • It should distinguish between the interventions aimed at ‘migrants for survival’ and ‘migrants for employment’.
  • It should provide more space to local bodies and NGOs which bring about structural changes in local regions.
  • It should focus on measures enhancing skill development would enable easier entry into the labour market.
  • It should also distinguish between individual and household migrants, because household migration necessitates access to infrastructure such as housing, sanitation and health care more than individual migration does.
  • The policy should improve financial infrastructure to enable the smooth flow of remittances and their effective use require more attention from India’s growing financial sector.

Topic: Important International institutions, agencies and fora- their structure, mandate.

4)  In the current day world, with all its on-going troubles, do you think WTO may still emerge as the lynchpin of global trade governance? Analyse.(250 words)

Indianexpress

 

Why this question:

 The article talks about the role WTO still has to play in global trade governance.

Key demand of the question:

Explain the relevance of WTO in today’s world despite the criticism faced by it owing to changing world trade conditions.

Directive:

AnalyzeWhen asked to analyse, you have to examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them as a whole in a summary.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Explain in brief the role that WTO has been playing since its genesis in managing world trade.

Body:

Discuss first its achievements from the past till present, explain how It also monitors the implementation of free trade agreements, produces research on global trade and economic policy, and serves as a forum for settling trade disputes between nations. An alternate way to look at the WTO’s success is not to focus on how much trade it has helped create and the corresponding tariff reductions, but the damage in trade value it has helped avert.

Take hints from the article and quote examples and justify in what way WTO still remains to be the lynchpin of global trade.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

The World Trade Organization remains an indispensable organisation but it requires urgent modernisation. Developed countries like US have constantly accused of developing nations using the tag to benefit unduly. The former have blamed the inefficiency of WTO to regulate this and threatened to quit the global body.

Body:

Achievements of WTO since its inception:

  • Since the WTO came into being in 1995, the world has witnessed massive changes, some deeply structural in nature.
  • New technologies have transformed the way we live, communicate, and trade.
  • In 1995, less than 0.8 per cent of the world’s population used the internet; in June 2019 it was around 57 per cent.
  • Communication technologies and containerisation lowered costs and boosted volumes of components moving in and out of countries allowing production chains to become increasingly international and also much more complex.
  • An iPhone, for example, has about 14 main components that are manufactured by 7-8 multinational companies with branches in more than 40 countries.
  • Overall trade in goods has nearly quadrupled since 1995, while WTO members’ import tariffs have declined by an average of 15 per cent.
  • Over half of world trade is now tariff-free (WTO, 2015).
  • Growth in trade has exceeded growth in world GDP and has been associated with improved standards of living.
  • Today, the WTO regulates more than 98 per cent of global trade flows among its members.
  • It also monitors the implementation of free trade agreements, produces research on global trade and economic policy, and serves as a forum for settling trade disputes between nations.
  • An alternate way to look at the WTO’s success is not to focus on how much trade it has helped create and the corresponding tariff reductions, but the damage in trade value it has helped avert. One estimate puts the value of avoided trade wars at $340 billion per year.

Challenges faced by WTO:

  • Dispute settlement cases continue to be filed for the time being and are being litigated. A civil dialogue over trade issues persists.
  • Technical functioning is now wholly inadequate to meet the major challenges to the strategic relevance of the WTO in the 21st century. In critical areas, the organisation has neither responded, nor adapted, nor delivered.
  • Dimensions of its structures and functions are fragile, creaking, and failing in parts.
  • Functioning of state enterprises engaging in commercial activities is interfering with and distorting the operative assumption of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)/WTO that international trade is to be conducted, principally, by private sector operators in response to conditions of supply and demand through price in a market economy.
  • Many WTO members bear responsibility for the use of trade-distorting domestic subsidies. Agricultural and industrial subsidies have caused blockages in the system and prompted protectionist reactions in a number of WTO members.
  • Blockage and deadlock in the Appellate Body stage of the WTO dispute settlement system triggered the present crisis.
  • The WTO lost the critical balance between the organisation as an institution established to support, consolidate, and bind economic reform to counter damaging protectionism, on the one hand, and the organisation as an institution for litigation-based dispute settlement, on the other hand.
  • For years now, the multilateral system for the settlement of trade dispute has been under intense scrutiny and constant criticism. The U.S. has systematically blocked the appointment of new Appellate Body members (“judges”) and de facto impeded the work of the WTO appeal mechanism.

Measures to revive WTO:

  • A vibrant WTO cannot accommodate conflicting economic models of market versus state. All WTO members will have to accept the operative assumption of a rules-based order steered by a market economy, the private sector, and competition.
  • Launch negotiations to address the intertwined issues of agricultural subsidies and market access, while recognising that food security concerns will not disappear.
  • A credible trading system requires a dispute settlement system that is accepted by all.
  • Launch serious negotiations to restore the balance, and we must do so in an open-ended plurilateral manner that cannot be blocked by those who do not want to move ahead.
  • GATT/WTO rules in a number of areas are outdated. New rules are required to keep pace with changes in the market and technology. Rules and disciplines on topics ranging from trade-distorting industrial subsidies to digital trade require updates.

Conclusion:

Members have to face the reality that the organisation requires non-cosmetic, serious root-and-branch reform for a WTO adapted to 21st century economic and political realities. A reformed WTO will have to be constructed on the foundation of liberal multilateralism, resting on open, non-discriminatory plurilateral pillars, an improved Appellate Body, explicit accommodation of regional trade agreements, and appropriate safety valves for rules-based sovereign action. A reaffirmed commitment to the rules-based liberal market order with a development dimension must be the foundational starting point.


Topic: Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment

5) In the recent times Microplastics evidently have compelling populace to look at plastics in a different way. Critically examine.(250 words)

Indianexpress

Why this question:

The question is based on the theme of microplastics.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must capture in what way the menace of microplastics has alarmed the people across the world and compelled to rethink over the use of plastics.

Directive:

Critically examineWhen asked to ‘Examine’, we have to look into the topic (content words) in detail, inspect it, investigate it and establish the key facts and issues related to the topic in question. While doing so we should explain why these facts and issues are important and their implications. When ‘critically’ is suffixed or prefixed to a directive, one needs to look at the good and bad of the topic and give a fair judgement.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin with definition of what are microplastics.

Body:

Discussion should include the following: 

Microplastics, which are defined as shreds of plastic less than 5 mm in length.

A study published in June estimated that the average human ends up consuming at least 50,000 particles of microplastics in food every year.

Quote facts similar to the above to justify the urgency to acknowledge the menace posed by the microplastics.

Explain in what way the use of microplastics can disrupt life.

Discuss what needs to be done to tackle the problem.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way solutions to address the issues.

Introduction:

Microplastics are small plastic particles in the environment that are generally smaller than 1mm down to the micrometer range. The researchers found huge amounts of them in the Arctic snow; their study claims to be the first that contains data on contamination of snow by microplastics.

Body:

Microfibres from washing of textiles, microbeads used in cosmetics and even paint from land run-offs can dump microplastics in the ocean. Plastic bottles, bags, fishing nets, and food packaging are some examples of the larger pieces that break down into microplastics, eventually finding their way into the soil, water and the air we breathe. According to a 2017 International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) report, microplastics are estimated to constitute up to 30% of marine litter polluting the oceans.

Concerns posed by Microplastics:

  • Microplastics escape the filtration and treatment processes for waste water and end up in sites of nature.
  • This is resulting in significant global impacts on wildlife from marine environment pollution.
  • Microplastics are killing the fish before they reach reproductive age, stunted growth and altering the behaviour in some fishes.
  • Microplastics are found in the viscera of dead sea birds, reptiles like turtles, whales etc.
  • World’s coastal countries currently do not have the concerned recycling policies or the technical capabilities, and so large quantities of plastic are not recycled and enter landfill.
  • The durable properties of plastics make them persistent and slow to degrade in the environment entering the food chains.
  • It holds the potential for both bioaccumulation and biomagnification.
  • Once the microplastics enter foodchain, they carry synthetic chemical compounds such as PCBs and PAHs, which are carcinogenic.
  • Unlike POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants) or chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), Plastic pollution has received little attention in terms of international agreements.
  • Microplastics make up 94 percent of an estimated 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic in the patch. But that only amounts to eight percent of the total tonnage

Measures needed:

  • Local actions are required for mitigating plastic pollution, using mechanisms such as bans on plastic bags, maximum daily limits for emissions into watersheds, and incentives for fishing gear retrieval.
  • Microbeads in cosmetics, daily use items must be banned globally.
  • Countries should come together to establish measurable reduction targets for plastic waste. A meaningful international agreement—one with clearly defined waste reduction targets is the need of the hour.
  • Effective policies must take into account all stages of the lifecycle of plastic—connecting producers to users and ultimately to waste managers.
  • Nonprofits like 5 Gyres are now pushing an agenda toward public awareness, corporate responsibility and the idea of a circular economy — an economy that focuses on keeping waste to a minimum while maximizing materials’ use.
  • Fossil fuel subsidies incentivise the plastic market. Hence, Countries should end fossil fuel subsidies. Annually, 4–8% of oil is used to produce raw plastic.
  • India has a major problem dealing with plastics, particularly single-use shopping bags that reach dumping sites, rivers and wetlands along with other waste.
  • The most efficient way to deal with the pollution is to control the production and distribution of plastics.
  • Banning single-use bags and making consumers pay a significant amount for the more durable ones is a feasible solution.
  • Enforcing segregation of waste will retrieve materials and greatly reduce the burden on the environment.
  • Waste separation can be achieved in partnership with the community, and presents a major employment opportunity.
  • Eco-friendly substitutes (cloth/paper/jute bags, leaves/areca leaf plates, paper straws) should be developed. For this, scientific and financial support (soft loans and subsidies) is required.

Conclusion:

Marine plastic pollution is a “planetary crisis,” and we should hope for a “Paris-style” global treaty aimed at tackling it. We cannot transform our world into a ‘plastic planet’. What is needed is collective public effort to stop plastic pollution and safeguard our ecosystem/biodiversity.


Topic: Emotional intelligence-concepts, and their utilities and application in administration and governance.

6) The EI of the leader plays important role in effectiveness of social interactions with others individuals. In the backdrop of the statement discuss the significance of EI in a leader.(250 words)

Ethics by Lexicon publications

Why this question:

The question is about discussing the relevance of emotional intelligence in the life of a leader.

Key demand of the question:

Explain in detail the role of EI in leadership.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Define emotional intelligence.

Body:

A big part of being a leader involves being credible, honest or trustworthy and for the leader to maintain such virtues it is essential to have high emotional intelligence.

State the qualities that a leader must possess and how effective emotional intelligence helps leader to exercise his responsibilities better.

Conclusion:

Conclude by reasserting significance of EI.

Introduction:

Emotional intelligence or EI is the ability to understand and manage your own emotions, and those of the people around you. People with a high degree of emotional intelligence know what they’re feeling, what their emotions mean, and how these emotions can affect other people.

Body:

Significance of EI in a leader:

  • Leaders who are emotionally intelligent foster safe environments, where employees feel comfortable to take calculated risks, suggest ideas and to voice their opinions.
  • In such safe environments, working collaboratively isn’t just an objective, but it gets woven into the organisational culture as whole.
  • When a leader is emotionally intelligent, they can use emotions to drive the organisation forward.
  • Leaders often have the responsibility of effecting any necessary changes in the organisation, and if they are aware of others’ possible emotional reactions to these changes they are able to plan and prepare the most optimal ways to make them.
  • Furthermore, emotionally intelligent leaders don’t take things personally and are able to forge ahead with plans without worrying about the impact on their egos.
  • Personal vendettas between leaders and employees are one of the commonest hindrances to productivity in many workplaces.
  • A self-aware leader maintains a clear picture of their strengths and weaknesses, and despite their position of authority and power still operates from a mindset of humility.
  • It calls for you to keep control of your emotions and how they affect others as well as stay committed to personal accountability.
  • Self-motivated leaders work consistently toward their goals, motivate their employees and they have extremely high standards for the quality of their work.
  • They develop a healthy emotional connection to the results they seek from their efforts, harnessing them to drive them forward without being obsessive.
  • Leaders with empathy actively support the career and personal growth of their team members, offer criticism without crushing the recipient, and solicit regular feedback from their employees.

Conclusion:

All the great leaders know there is a lot power in their emotions so they make sure to learn how to identify, understand and manage them, and also go ahead to teach those they lead how to do the same. This is referred to as having emotional intelligence and is one of the most important traits for any leader in any modern day organisation to have.


Topic: Emotional intelligence-concepts, and their utilities and application in administration and governance.

7) “Anybody can become angry, that is easy; but to be angry with the right person, and to the right degree, and at the right time, and for the right purpose, and in the right way, that is not within everybody’s power, that is not easy.” —Aristotle. Evaluate the statement in the context of the concept of emotional intelligence. (250 words)

Ethics by Lexicon publications

 

Why this question:

The statement is in the context of significance that emotional intelligence holds in the life of an individual.

Key demand of the question:

Explain in detail the significance of emotional intelligence and its application aspects in all spheres of life.

Directive:

EvaluateWhen you are asked to evaluate, you have to pass a sound judgement about the truth of the given statement in the question or the topic based on evidences.  You have to appraise the worth of the statement in question. There is scope for forming a personal opinion here.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Briefly define the concept of emotional intelligence.

Body:

Explain that Emotional Intelligence is the summative of abilities, competencies and skills that signify a collection of knowledge in order to cope with life effectively. Therefore, it is closely related to the personal and professional growth of the individuals who have to take decisions under stressful and difficult situations.

One has to open up the statement quoted by Aristotle and use suitable illustrations to justify their answers.

Conclusion:

Conclude with significance of handling emotions.

Introduction:

The above quote is about anger, and how easy it is to get wrong. So wrote Aristotle, more than 2000 years ago, in his classic work The Art of Rhetoric. His words don’t quite square with our modern concept of anger. Anger is an extremely powerful emotion. If you display it constantly, others will avoid you like the plague.

Body:

Emotional intelligence (EQ), or the ability to recognize and understand emotions, and then use that information to guide decision making, is extremely useful in helping you to deal with anger effectively. Recognizing that you need to choose your battles helps you from becoming overly anxious and possibly burning out.

For example, a situation may cause you to become angry because you don’t fully understand it. You might witness an action and perceive it to be an injustice, but every situation has context and background, much of which you aren’t privy to. Keeping that point in mind will keep you from butting into situations that really don’t involve you

The truth is, there are plenty of instances when you’re right to get angry. For example, let’s say a certain colleague of yours really gets on your nerves. You know the type–always leaving unwashed dishes in the sink, constantly complaining, often disrespectful. You’ve endured this behavior for a while, and one day you’re moved to do something about it.

Anger is like fire. It can be a useful tool, or it can be hideously destructive. In contrast, if you take time to think your actions and their consequences through, your strategy will be much more effective. Of course, in the heat of the moment, you won’t always be inspired to sit back and reflect on the situation. That’s why it’s important to learn to keep control.

Conclusion:

All of us will get angry from time to time. But using these strategies will help you to increase your EQ, control your anger, and express your feelings in a way that is more beneficial–to you, and to others.