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Insights SECURE SYNOPSIS: 19 AUGUST 2019


SECURE SYNOPSIS: 19 AUGUST 2019


NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same time gives you extra points in the form of background information.


Topic: population and associated issues

1) Rather than worrying for population control alone the country must work specifically to avert the alarming gender crisis to restore the balance. Comment in the context of recent controversies surrounding the policy and action for population control. (250 words)

Livemint

Why this question:

The long dormant issue of a “population explosion” has come to the national forefront, with Prime Minister Narendra Modi calling it a challenge in his Independence Day speech. 

Key demand of the question:

Answer must significantly explain the urgency to focus of the gender crisis the country is facing.

Directive:

Commenthere we have to express our knowledge and understanding of the issue and form an overall opinion thereupon.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Narrate the crisis of sex ratio India is witnessing.

Body:

The answer must explicitly explain upon the widening gender gap.

India has about 930 females per 1,000 males. This sex ratio is alarming, but the skew looks even worse if you look at new births. According to government figures, the country’s sex ratio at birth declined from 900 females per 1,000 males in 2013-15 to 896 in 2015-17. 

Explain that this is a phenomenon that is likely to impact India hard in the decades ahead.

Suggest what needs to be done to avert gender crisis, how we must work to restore the balance.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

In 2050, India’s population is projected to be 1.69 billion, which will be higher than that of China. The population of China is estimated to be 1.31 billion in the same year. But there is hope. According to Sample Registration System data, the country’s total fertility rate—roughly, the average number of children born to a woman—has fallen to an estimated 2.2. This figure is only marginally higher than 2.1, the replacement rate of the existing population. However, the widening gender gap in India poses a big problem.

Body:

Declining Sex Ratio in India:

  • India has about 930 females per 1,000 males. This sex ratio is alarming, but the skew looks even worse if you look at new births.
  • According to government figures, the country’s sex ratio at birth declined from 900 females per 1,000 males in 2013-15 to 896 in 2015-17.
  • This is a phenomenon that is likely to impact India hard in the decades ahead.
  • A report from the NITI Aayog (2018) highlighted that sex ratio at birth (SRB) nationwide had dropped from 906 in 2012-2014 to 900 in 2013-2015.
  • In all, 17 of 21 large Indian States saw a drop in the SRB, with Gujarat performing the worst, declining 53 points.
  • Also, newer data from India’s Sample Registration System show the SRB fell even further in 2014-2016, from 900 to 898.

Implications of lowering sex ratio:

  • Low Sex ratio at birth has led to large numbers of “surplus men” in countries like India and China.
  • Skewed sex ratio lead to more violence against men and women, as well as human trafficking.
  • In India, some villages in Haryana and Punjab have such poor ratios that men “import” brides from other states. This is often accompanied by the exploitation of these brides.
  • Skewed sex ratio reduces the ability to women to influence policy making and act as a pressure group.
  • Skewed sex ratio is leading to the practice of bride purchase. This is leading to objectification of women.

Measures needed:

  • The welfare schemes must be aimed at not only bringing the structural reforms rather attitudinal changes. For example: the Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao program launched as a movement.
  • Promoting the women participation at the higher levels so that the empowerment can penetrate through their efforts. For example the 108 CAA be implemented to provide 33% reservation to the women in the parliament. This empowers the few and inspires the millions.
  • Involving multiple stakeholders like the civil society and the NGO’s in the policy cycle so that the effectiveness of the implementation can be ensured with due participation go the people. For example: the ASHA, ANM through the civil society awakening the people through them these institutions need to be empowered through the ICDS and adequate resources and training methodologies be made more robust.
  • Capacity building program for empowering the women through an inward out process. For example: SHG’s for micro lending linkage.
  • Convergence of all departments at the district-level, coupled with strong political will and co-ordinated efforts by all districts in the State
  • Creation of a social media group, moderated by the Additional Principal Secretary to the Chief Minister. This forum enabled healthy competition between different districts and helped them learn from each other’s experiences.
  • Universal health Care System which focuses especially on Girl Child and women at large.
  • Special focus on pregnant and lactating women to Ensure better health of both Girl Child and Mother – ICDS, JSY, JSSY, Maternity Leave and allowance.
  • Educating the Adolescent Girl Children about Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Health.
  • Improvement in the food quality of Mid-Day Meal Scheme.
  • Bio-fortification of food grains distributed through PDS which address Hidden Hunger.

Conclusion:

Initiatives like Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao in Haryana have shown that concentrated efforts can aid in countering the declining sex ratio. Similar initiatives must be undertaken at high priority regions to counter the declining sex ratio.


Topic: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

2) Appointment of a chief of defence staff (CDS), would constitute the most significant defence policy reform in decades for India. Comment.(250 words)

Livemint

Why this question:

 In his Independence Day address, Prime Minister announced the creation of the post of Chief of Defence Staff.

Key demand of the question:

Answer must evaluate the significance of such an appointment and in what way it can bring significant change in the Defence wings of the country.

Directive:

Commenthere we have to express our knowledge and understanding of the issue and form an overall opinion thereupon.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Define who is a CDS – The CDS is a high military office that oversees and coordinates the working of the three Services.

Body:

Discuss about the CDS, roles and functions of such an office – CDS shall provide “effective leadership at the top level” to the three wings of the armed forces, and to help improve coordination among them.

It offers seamless tri-service views and single-point advice to the Executive (in India’s case, to the Prime Minister) on long-term defence planning and management, including manpower, equipment and strategy, and above all, “jointsmanship” in operations.

Explain in depth the case of having a CDS for the country.

Conclusion:

Conclude with significance.

Introduction:

The Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) is a high military office that oversees and coordinates the working of the three Services, and offers seamless tri-service views and single-point advice to the Executive (in India’s case, to the Prime Minister) on long-term defence planning and management, including manpower, equipment and strategy, and above all, “jointsmanship” in operations. It shall provide “effective leadership at the top level” to the three wings of the armed forces, and to help improve coordination among them.

Body:

Need for office of CDS:

  • The move was considered necessary after the 1999 Kargil War and was first approved by the Atal Bihari Vajpayee cabinet in May 2001.
  • India has had a feeble equivalent known as the Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee (CoSC); but a toothless office in the manner of its structure.
  • The senior-most among the three Service Chiefs is appointed to head the CoSC, an office that lapses with the incumbent’s retirement.
  • The post did not further tri-service integration, resulting in inefficiency and an expensive duplication of assets.
  • By 2001, it had become clear to the leaders of India’s strategic establishment that jointness—the combination of land, sea and air power—was necessary to effectively combat adversaries, who employed everything from terrorists and militants to regular troops through to nuclear weapons.
  • With information, cyberspace and space becoming military domains already, the jointness which is required surpasses merely getting the groups in uniform together.

CDS – a significant defence policy reform:

  • The appointment of the CDS will certainly change the civil-military balance, and, if done correctly, will address some of the grievances of the Armed Forces pertaining to their status vis-à-vis the civil services.
  • The underlying rationale for appointing a CDS is to separate management and command of the Armed Forces.
  • To take the logic of the CDS to its conclusion, the Armed Forces must be operationally restructured into theatre commands—complete joint war-fighting formations—led by combatant commanders.
  • In the years ahead, a combination of climate change, violent non-state actors and volatile politics will increase the demands on the government to deploy military forces beyond the subcontinent.
  • Despite a multitude of threats, India’s Armed Forces have very limited capacity to operate overseas. Hence, the need for an expeditionary CDS.
  • From a defence policy perspective, the CDS presents us with the opportunity to optimize defence economics and make expenditure more effective.

Way forward:

  • To take the logic of the CDS to its conclusion, the Armed Forces should be operationally restructured into theatre commands
  • The late strategic thinker K. Subrahmanyam argued that the army and navy chiefs should first hand over their command to theatre commanders, with the air chief doing so at a later stage.
  • Three theatres are straightforward: Northern, Western and Southern to address the threats from China, Pakistan and the Indian Ocean, respectively.
  • He envisaged doubling the air force to 60 squadrons by 2030 and placing them under theatre commands.

Conclusion:

Most countries with advanced militaries have such a post, albeit with varying degrees of power and authority. The United States Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee (CJCSC), for example, is extremely powerful, with a legislated mandate and sharply delineated powers. The role of the CDS becomes critical in times of conflict.


Topic:  Parliament and State Legislatures – structure, functioning, conduct of business, powers & privileges

3) Why Some States in India have Bicameral Legislatures? Discuss the relevance of the Legislative Councils in the States in the backdrop of recent demand of certain states to create the second house. (250 words)

Indianexpress

 

Why this question: 

The article discusses the debates surrounding the creation of Legislative Councils in states. The issue gains significance in light of the wish of Odisha to have an upper house of its own. The creation of Legislative Councils needs to be evaluated in this question.

Demand of the question:

The question expects us to discuss the role Legislative Councils play and how useful are they for states. The question makes an assertion that if LCs were useful for states, each state would have one. Since not all states are having LCs, it indicates the limited utility of LCs. We have to give our opinion on this assertion mainly.

Directive word: 

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction

Explain the constitutional provisions regarding LCs and highlight the number of states that have LCs in India.

Body

  • Discuss the role that LCs were envisaged to perform as per the founding fathers of our constitution – as a revisory house, give an opportunity to diverse section to be a part of the law-making process etc.
  • Highlight the status quo of functioning of Legislative councils in the states in India.
  • Mention the negatives of having an LC – Constitution Assembly itself felt this body would delay legislative process, not a representative of people directly, and an expensive institution, no real power except the power to delay legislations etc.
  • Discuss the recommendations of committees like 2nd ARC and what they have suggested for improving the functioning of LCs – election of members of legislative council, role of teachers and graduates should be decreased or done away with and how more say should be given to local bodies. 
  • Examine whether a national policy for states to have LCs should be encouraged.

Conclusion 

Give your view on the importance of LC for states and the way forward.

Introduction:

Bicameralism is the practice of having two Houses of Parliament. At the State level, the equivalent of the Lok Sabha is the Vidhan Sabha (Legislative Assembly), and that of the Rajya Sabha is the Vidhan Parishad (Legislative Council). At present, 6 states have bicameral legislatures. Most recently the Madhya Pradesh government has indicated that it plans to initiate steps towards creation of a Legislative Council.

Body:

Under Article 169 of the constitution, Parliament may by law create or abolish the second chamber in a state if the Legislative Assembly of that state passes a resolution to that effect by a special majority.

Rationale behind setting up Legislative councils in states:

  • To act as a check on hasty actions by the popularly elected House.
  • To ensure that individuals who might not be cut out for the rough-and-tumble of direct elections too are able to contribute to the legislative process.
  • An Upper House provides a forum for academicians and intellectuals. It provides a mechanism for a more sober and considered appraisal of legislation that a State may pass.
  • The legislative councils do accommodate such mature and serene personalities not only through the nominated quota at the disposal of Governor but also through the quota reserved for teachers and the graduates.
  • It lessens the burden of the lower House and enables it to fully concentrate on measures of greater importance.
  • LCs were envisaged to perform as per the founding fathers of our constitution as a revisory house, give an opportunity to diverse section to be a part of the law making process etc

Relevance of Legislative councils:

  • Opposition to the idea of Legislative Councils is centred on three broad arguments:
    • They can be used to park leaders who have not been able to win an election.
    • They can be used to delay progressive legislation.
    • They would strain state finances.
    • In the West Bengal also one of the main reasons for its abolition was stated as unnecessary burden on the State exchequer.
  • The process of creating an Upper House is lengthy:
    • The State Assembly has to pass a resolution for the creation of the Council by a majority of its total membership. Thereafter, Parliament has to enact a law to create it. Two Bills introduced in the Rajya Sabha in 2013 for establishing Legislative Councils in Assam and Rajasthan are still pending, indicating the lack of support for such a move.
    • Another issue is that graduates are no longer rare. Also, with dipping educational standards, a graduate degree is no guarantee of any real intellectual heft.
  • Constitution gives Councils limited legislative powers:-]
    • Unlike Rajya Sabha which has substantial powers to shape non-financial legislation, Legislative Councils lack the constitutional mandate to do so. Legislative Assemblies have the power to override suggestions/amendments made to a legislation by the Council.
    • While Rajya Sabha MPs can vote in the election of the President and Vice-President, members of Legislative Councils can’t. MLCs also can’t vote in the elections of Rajya Sabha members.
    • As regards Money bills, only fourteen days’ delay can be caused by the Council, which is more or less a formality rather than a barrier in the way of Money Bill passed by the Assembly.

Way forward:

 

  • Recommendations of committees like 2nd ARC need to be implemented for improving the functioning of LCs like the election of members of legislative council, role of teachers and graduates should be decreased or done away with.
  • More say should be given to local bodies so that they can represent local bodies at state level as Rajya sabha represents states at national level. This will help strengthen the root level democracy.
  • There is need of a National Policy on having Upper House in State Legislatures. The provision of the law for Councils to have seats for graduates and teachers should also be reviewed.

Conclusion:

Dr. B.R. Ambedkar compared it to a “curate’s egg—good only in parts“. There is a need for wide range of debates and public and intellectual opinion to have an Upper House in all state legislatures. Legislative councils should be a responsible body that can also form their part in policies and programmes for the development of states.


Topic: Conservation, Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

5) Indian Monsoon’s increasing unpredictability calls for greater efficiency in rainwater storage and use. Do you agree? Elucidate with suitable justifications. (250 words)

Indianexpress

Why this question:

The article discusses the urgency of focusing on storage and use of rainwater efficiently to address the water crisis facing the country.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must relate the unpredictability of the Indian monsoon and relevance of rainwater storage and use.

Directive:

ElucidateGive a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Describe the recent unpredictable nature of Indian Monsoons.

Body:

The answer must explain the issue of Indian monsoon – fewer rainy days and more extreme precipitation, explain its impact on agriculture etc.

Discuss the monsoonal vagaries and how it has impacted the Indian economy and life.

Take hints from the article and debate over and form a balanced opinion and justify with examples the urgent need to press on storage and harvest of rainwater.

Conclusion:

Conclude with importance of conserving water.

Introduction:

It is said that “agriculture is the backbone of Indian economy.” To an agriculturist, water is more valuable. In many ways, the monsoon is the lifeblood of India’s farm-dependent economy. The Monsoon’s increasing unpredictability calls for greater efficiency in rainwater storage and use.

Body:

Unpredictability of Monsoon in India:

  • In June, rainfall was 8 per cent deficient on an average across India and the prospect of a monsoon failure loomed large.
  • And with the dry spell extending from September in many parts, the return of food inflation, it seemed, would present the re-elected government with its first big challenge.
  • But in July, the rains turned out 6 per cent more than the average.
  • In this month, till August 17, they have been a whopping 34.9 per cent above normal.
  • As a result, cumulative rainfall for the southwest monsoon season (June-September), which was almost one-third deficit till June-end, has now become 9 per cent surplus.
  • Such a dramatic turnaround is, perhaps, unprecedented.
  • The current revival has also helped substantially close the gap in kharif crop plantings: Till July 5, the total area sown by farmers was 26.7 per cent lower than last year’s corresponding coverage.
  • That has since narrowed to just 5.3 per cent, which should considerably assuage food inflation fears.

The monsoon’s increasing unpredictability, with fewer rainy days and more extreme precipitation. For the farmer, this is a nightmare. When the rains don’t come on time, pour when they do, or take extended breaks, it disrupts the entire cropping cycle from the sowing, vegetative and reproductive growth stage right up to harvesting. Agriculture is a gamble in the best of times; but now it becomes a game of pure chance embodying risk as well as uncertainty. And blaming it all on climate change is hardly helpful.

Rainwater harvest and storage – a potential solution:

  • India has some 107 major reservoirs with over 166 billion cubic meters’ active storage capacity.
  • A time-bound programme for lining of irrigation channels — or even better, replacing all open canals with pressurised HDPE/PVC piped distribution networks — will enable the water filled in these dams during the monsoon to be used for a longer period.
  • The same water can be further conveyed to farmers’ fields through drip/sprinkler irrigation.
  • Harvesting of rainwater, whether in large reservoirs or farm ponds, and which can take place any time during the monsoon season, will give farmers greater flexibility in their cropping operations.

Challenges in the above approach:

  • Dam safety issues: Most dams are old and pose grave threat to the people living downstream.
  • Evaporation: India has more than 300 sunny days and reservoir storage can lead to evaporation.
  • Issues with states: The storage of water in reservoirs in one state can lead to shortage of water in other states leading to tussle between states.
  • Lack of education: Huge storage levels could lead to reckless usage of water

Thus, only water storage is not the panacea. There is need for other measures too:

  • In rainfed areas, water security primarily depends upon rainwater harvesting and the efficient use of the available water through techniques like drip irrigation, and the appropriate choice of farming systems.
  • Groundwater augmentation and management is an important method of ensuring adequate and timely availability of water for crops. Fortunately, the concept of ‘more crop per drop’ is being promoted by the government.
  • The government must resolve to address the structural issues and there is a need to give farmers not just a better, but also more stable, return on their crops.
  • The monsoon-dependent Indian economy needs climate-sensitive budgeting.
  • The excessive dependence on monsoon may be mitigated by the construction of modern irrigation canals, afforestation, and diversification of Indian industries.
  • Farmers, especially smallholder farmers, need advance warning of emergent weather conditions at a local level.
  • Develop climate-smart agriculture practices.
  • Build adaptive capacities to climate variability and strengthen the sustainability of farming systems.
  • Preventive measures for drought that include growing of pulses and oilseeds instead of rice.
  • Mobile telecommunication systems are increasingly cost-effective and an efficient way of delivering weather-based agro-advisories to farmers at a large scale.
  • Allied agricultural practices like Agroforestry, Apiary, Fisheries, Animal husbandry should be promoted which can act as economic alternative in times of Monsoon failure.

Topic: Emotional intelligence-concepts, and their utilities and application in administration and governance.

6) Discuss the concept of emotional intelligence and suggest the various applications of emotional intelligence. (250 words)

Ethics by Lexicon publications

Why this question:

The question is straight forward and aims to discuss the concept of emotional intelligence and its application.

Key demand of the question:

Explain in detail the concept and in what way it can be applied in an individual’s life.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Define Emotional intelligence.

Body:

Explain the following points – 

  • The term was coined by two researchers – Peter Salovey and John Mayer in 1990 but got popular in 1996 from Dan Goleman’s book ‘Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ’.
  • Emotional intelligence refers to ‘the ability to identify one’s own emotions and those of others, harness and apply them to tasks, and to regulate and manage them’.
  • Emotional Quotient (EQ) is a measure of one’s EI i.e. through a standardized test, one’s awareness of emotions in relation to self and others is known.
  • Explain the applicability of EI in individual’s life, in administration, civil services etc. using suitable examples.

Conclusion:

Conclude by suggesting what needs to be done to ensure EI and how to practice the same.

Introduction:

Emotional intelligence or EI is the ability to understand and manage your own emotions, and those of the people around you. Emotional intelligence is the ability to perceive emotions, to access and generate emotions so as to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional knowledge, and to reflectively regulate emotions so as to promote emotional and intellectual growth.

Body:

Concept of EI:

According to Daniel Goleman, an American psychologist who helped to popularize emotional intelligence, there are five key elements to it:

  • Self-awareness:
    • The ability to recognize and understand personal moods and emotions and drives, as well as their effect on others.
    • Hallmarks of self-awareness include self-confidence, realistic self-assessment, and a self-deprecating sense of humour.
    • Emotional awareness: This deals with knowledge of one’s emotions and their effects. People having this competency are more aware of their feelings and performance.
    • Accurate self-assessment: This involves being aware of one’s strengths and weaknesses. One is open to feedbacks, new viewpoints, etc.
    • Self-confidence: This relates to complete affirmation of one’s worth and abilities. They are usually more confident and are able to make sound decisions despite any uncertainties or pressures
  • Self-management:
    • Ability to control or redirect disruptive impulses and moods, and the propensity to suspend judgment and to think before acting. Hallmarks include trustworthiness and integrity; comfort with ambiguity; and openness to change.
    • Adaptability: This involves flexible attitude towards change. People with this competency find it easy to handle changing routines, multiple roles and even shifting priorities.
    • Innovativeness: This involves getting easy with and open to new information and ideas. People who possess this are able to gather new ideas from multiple sources, set challenging roles and are able to take calculated risks. They evolve original solutions to various problems.
  • Social Awareness:
    • The ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people. A skill in treating people according to their emotional reactions.
    • Empathy does not necessarily imply compassion. Empathy can be ‘used’ for compassionate or cruel behaviour. Serial killers who marry and kill many partners in a row tend to have great emphatic skills.
  • Relationship management:
    • Proficiency in managing relationships and building networks, and an ability to find common ground and build rapport. Hallmarks of social skills include effectiveness in leading change, persuasiveness, and expertise building and leading teams.
  • Motivation:
    • A passion to work for internal reasons that go beyond money and status -which are external rewards, – such as an inner vision of what is important in life, a joy in doing something, curiosity in learning, a flow that comes with being immersed in an activity.

Applications of EI:

  • Emotional intelligence in administration can be used for the following ways:
    • Appraising emotions arising from situations.
    • Using emotions for reason based decisions and policy making.
    • Identifying emotions in faces, voices, postures, and other content during public management activities.
  • Recruitment:
    • EQ measurement is invaluable in selecting and recruiting high performance workers.
  • Predicting performance:
    • Some companies are blending IQ testing with scientific measurement of EQ to predict job performance and direct workers to jobs where they are most likely to succeed.
  • Negotiation:
    • Whether you’re dealing with a trading partner, competitor, customer or colleague, being able to empathize and be creative in finding win-win solutions will consistently pay off
  • Performance management:
    • 360-degree feedback is a common tool for assessing EQ. Knowing how your self-perception compares with others’ views about your performance provides focus for career development and positive behavioural changes
  • Peer relationships:
    • Good networking skills are a staple of job effectiveness for the average worker.
    • Networking has too often been associated with “using” other people, but a heightened EQ ensures a mutually beneficial approach to others.
  • Social responsibility:
    • When a leader cares about others, he is not a centre of attention and keeps everyone in the loop by making their intentions known.
  • Stress tolerance:
    • To stay focused, stress should be managed and it involves own reactions to stress or the reactions of others to the stress.
  • Impulse control:
    • Independent people evaluate the alternatives and initiate the work by taking appropriate action by executing the right options.
    • People who manage their impulses avoid being distracted and losing control of the situation.
  • Optimism:
    • Optimistic people have a target that they’re aiming toward. These people are confident in their ability to carry out the required actions and meet the target by looking for successful solutions to problems.

Conclusion:

Good ethics reaffirm the emotional intelligence of a person. High  emotionally  intelligent  individuals  are  more  adept  at  reasoning  through  the emotional antecedents of their own and others’ behavior and using this information to guide thinking and action. Individuals high on emotional intelligence will be able to manage their emotions and react less aggressively to the behaviours of others.


Topic: Emotional intelligence-concepts, and their utilities and application in administration and governance.

7) Debate upon the significance of the concept of emotional intelligence in today’s Digital age of alienation. (250 words)

Ethics by Lexicon publications

 

Why this question:

The question aims to evaluate the relevance of EI in the age of digital world.

Key demand of the question:

Explain in what way EI plays a vital role in the Digital age of alienation.

Directive:

DebateThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Briefly define what is emotional intelligence.

Body:

  • Emotional intelligence refers to ‘the ability to identify one’s own emotions and those of others, harness and apply them to tasks, and to regulate and manage them’. Emotional Quotient (EQ) is a measure of one’s EI i.e. through a standardized test, one’s awareness of emotions in relation to self and others is known.
  • Discuss the impact of digitalness in today’s world – digital alienation refers to manifestations of alienation online.
  • Explain using day to day examples, suggest in what way EI plays a key role in managing emotions in a difficult world alienated by technology, social media etc.

Conclusion:

Conclude by reasserting significance of EI.

Introduction:

Daniel Goleman defines it in his book, emotional intelligence is the ability to monitor our own and other people’s emotions, to distinguish between different emotions and label them appropriately, and to use this information to guide our thinking and behavior.

Body:

In today’s day and age, it’s fair to say that we’re being overtaken by technology. In this new and improved digital age, the world is focused on productivity, and banging out as much as possible in little time. This can often be overwhelming for the average human being, with many of us wondering what the point is behind all of this technology and advancement.

Digital age and Alienation:

  • In the digital age, there’s flood of information, indoor-lifestyle, people are losing direct touch with each other, relations have become calculative and materialistic.
  • For instance, a smart machine might be able to diagnose an illness and even recommend treatment better than a doctor. It takes a person, however, to sit with a patient, understand their life situation (finances, family, quality of life, etc.), and help determine what treatment plan is optimal. This is where emotional intelligence would help.
  • Whereas a farmer knows the purpose of rice he cultivates- that people will eat it and feel happy. Farmer is directly contributing to someone’s life.
  • Similarly, in IT company, you’re writing a script-code that will become part of some big system, yet you don’t know what exact purpose you’ve served.
  • Such person has no idea what is the purpose of his life and what is his contribution to the society? He gets alienated from work, alienated from society. He’ll begin to see other people in “profit-loss” calculation.
  • In the end he’ll get alienated from himself and this will cause all the emotional/mental disorders.

Importance of EI in digital age:

  • Skills like persuasion, social understanding, and empathy are going to become differentiators as artificial intelligence and machine learning take over our other tasks.
  • If we are going to empower machines, algorithms, and software to do more of the work that humans used to perform, we have to imbue them with some of the empathy and limitations that people have.
  • For example Chatbots are becoming good at mimicking our language. But until they can detect our emotional state and respond accordingly, they might never reach their full potential.
  • If a human being feels like they have purpose in life and are being fulfilled, they are more likely to be happy. This means employers need to ensure that their workers are feeling fulfilled and feel like they are contributing to themselves and society to achieve the greatest results.
  • Social robotics is an area where social and emotional intelligence skills are key.
  • Building AI systems that have empathy with clear ethical guidelines is critical to the decision-making logic of these AI systems. Emotional intelligence is a key part of that.
  • If humans with this emotional intelligence can work happily alongside these machines, the company will benefit even more than if the person did not feel fulfilled.

Conclusion:

In a world order led by super intelligence, emotional intelligence will be the only arrow in the human quiver to rein in super intelligence. In the digital age, emotional intelligence is a necessary requirement in order to properly adapt to the complex and multigenerational business environment.