SECURE SYNOPSIS: 06 JUNE 2019

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SECURE SYNOPSIS: 06 JUNE 2019


NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same time gives you extra points in the form of background information.


Topic:Distribution of key natural resources across the world (including South Asia and the Indian subcontinent); factors responsible for the location of primary, secondary, and tertiary sector industries in various parts of the world (including India).

1) What are a Rare Earth Minerals? Why are they strategically important? Discuss  their uses from strategic, developmental and environmental perspective.(250 words)

Livemint

Why this question:

China has threatened to curb the export of rare earth minerals to the US as the trade war between the world’s two largest economies escalates, The Asian country is the world’s largest producer and consumer of rare earth minerals. 

Key demands of the question:

With escalating tensions between US and China, and with china wanting to limit rare earth exports to the US, it becomes imperative for us to study and analyse the context.

Directive word

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction

In a few introductory lines define Rare earth minerals – Rare earth elements (REE) are a group of seventeen chemical elements that occur together in the periodic table, 15 lanthanides (Z=57 through 71), Scandium and Yttrium..

Body

Discuss the following aspects in the answer:

  • What are rare earth minerals? Why are they called as rare earth minerals?
  • What is the significance of Rare Earth Elements (REE)?
  • Discuss its utility in terms of – defense, strategy environment etc.
  • Global Uses and Production of Rare Earth Elements
  • What are the issues involved?
  • Aspect of China? – why and what is the turf?

Conclusion

Conclude with their significance and what needs to be done to overcome the challenges involved therein.

Introduction:

The rare earths minerals (REM) are a set of seventeen metallic elements. These include the fifteen lanthanides on the periodic table in addition to scandium and yttrium that show similar physical and chemical properties to the lanthanides. The REMs have unique catalytic, metallurgical, nuclear, electrical, magnetic and luminescent properties. While named ‘rare earth’, they are in fact not that rare and are relatively abundant in the Earth’s crust

Body:

Strategic importance of REMs:

  • They have distinctive electrical, metallurgical, catalytic, nuclear, magnetic and luminescent properties.
  • They are strategically very important due to their use of emerging and diverse technologies which cater to the needs of current society.
  • Its usage range from daily use (e.g., lighter flints, glass polishing mediums, car alternators) to high-end technology (lasers, magnets, batteries, fibre-optic telecommunication cables).
  • Even futuristic technologies need these REMs (For example high-temperature superconductivity, safe storage and transport of hydrogen for a post-hydrocarbon economy, environmental global warming and energy efficiency issues).
  • The global demand for REMs has increased significantly in line with their expansion into high-end technology, environment, and economic areas.
  • They are extremely important for many modern technologies, including consumer electronics, computers, and networks, communications, clean energy, advanced transportation, health care, environmental mitigation, national defense etc.
  • Due to their unique magnetic, luminescent, and electrochemical properties, they help in technologies perform with reduced weight, reduced emissions, and energy consumption; therefore give them greater efficiency, performance, miniaturization, speed, durability, and thermal stability.

Applications of REMs in various fields:

  • Electronics: Television screens, computers, cell phones, silicon chips, monitor displays, long-life rechargeable batteries, camera lenses, light emitting diodes (LEDs), compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), baggage scanners, marine propulsion systems.
  • Defence Sector: Rare earth elements play an essential role in our national defence. The military uses night-vision goggles, precision-guided weapons, communications equipment, GPS equipment, batteries and other defence electronics. These give the United States military an enormous advantage. Rare earth metals are key ingredients for making the very hard alloys used in armoured vehicles and projectiles that shatter upon impact.
  • Renewable Energy: Solar panels, Hybrid automobiles, wind turbines, next generation rechargeable batteries, bio-fuel catalysts.
  • Manufacturing: High strength magnets, metal alloys, stress gauges, ceramic pigments, colorants in glassware, chemical oxidizing agent, polishing powders, plastics creation, as additives for strengthening other metals, automotive catalytic converters
  • Medical Science: Portable x-ray machines, x-ray tubes, magnetic resonance imagery (MRI) contrast agents, nuclear medicine imaging, cancer treatment applications, and for genetic screening tests, medical and dental lasers.
  • Technology: Lasers, optical glass, fibre optics, masers, radar detection devices, nuclear fuel rods, mercury-vapour lamps, highly reflective glass, computer memory, nuclear batteries, high temperature superconductors.

However, the extraction of REMs is one of the most environmentally negative and toxic generating of all mining practices. Disproportionate rare earth mining has resulted into landslides, clogged rivers, environmental pollution emergencies and even major accidents and disasters, causing great damage to people’s safety and health and the ecological environment.

Conclusion:

The ‘Make in India’ program whose goal is to make India a manufacturing economy will need REMs in huge amount. Although India is among the top five nations with reserves of rare-earth minerals, there is no required technology to extract in environmentally sustainable way. Thus, India will need to firm up diplomatic trade channels and long-term supply contracts. There is also a need to develop suitable technologies, promote Research and Development to tap the REM.


Topic: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

2) Discuss the objectives of Jan Shikshan Sansthans (JSS), In what way do you think it can successfully re-energize and reinvigorate vocational training and skill development aspects in the country?(250 words)

The hindu

Why this question:

The Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship has decided to waive off fee for SC/ST candidates who join vocational training under Jan Shikshan Sansthans (JSS).

Key demand of the question:

The answer must provide for an assessment of the program – Jan Shikshan Sansthans (JSS) and its contributions to vocational training and skill development.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

In a few lines explain the vocational training and skill development scenario of the country.

Body:

  • The answer must have a detailed discussion upon the salient features of the program;
  • Formerly under the Ministry of Human Resources Development, Jan Shikshan Sansthans was transferred to the Ministry of Skill Development & Entrepreneurship in 2018.
  • Jan Shikshan Sansthans (JSS) were established to provide vocational training to non-literate, neo-literate, as well as school dropouts by identifying skills as would have a market in the region of their establishment.
  • They were formerly known as Shramik Vidyapeeth.
  • The JSSs are unique, they link literacy with vocational skills and provide large doses of Life Enrichment Education (LEE) to the people.
  • They aim for convergence with other stakeholders in society. It is their endeavor to shape their beneficiaries into self-reliant and self-assured employees and entrepreneurs.
  • Then discuss in what way the approach in this program is different from others.
  • What can be the way forward.

Conclusion:

Conclude by reasserting significance of vocational training and skill development in the country.

Introduction:

  • Jan Shikshan Sansthan (formerly known as Shramik Vidyapeeth) have a challenging mandate of providing vocational skills to non-literate, neo-literates as well as school drop-outs by identifying skills that have a market in the region of their establishment.
  • The JSSs are unique, they link literacy with vocational skills and provide large doses of Life Enrichment Education (LEE) to the people.
  • They aim for convergence with other stakeholders in society. It is their endeavour to shape their beneficiaries into self reliant and self-assured employees and entrepreneurs.

Body:

The objectives/scope of Jan Shikshan Sansthans (JSSs) includes the following:

  • Develop/Source appropriate curriculum and training modules covering vocational elements, general awareness and life enrichment components.
  • JSS’s are encouraged to undertake training equivalent to courses designed by the Directorate of Adult Education, National Institute of Open Schooling and Director General, Employment & Training.
  • Provide training to a pool of resource persons and master trainers for conducting training.
  • Administer simple tests and award certificates.
  • Network with employers and industries for trainees to get suitable placement

Recently, comprehensive reforms for Jan Shikshan Sansthan (JSS) were released, to further strengthen the skills ecosystem benefiting those in the underprivileged sections of society. The new norms are expected to help identify and promote traditional skills in the district through skilling / upskilling; create livelihood linkages and boost training of trainers to develop the capacity through National Skills Training Institutes.

Potential of JSS:

  • They have been reformed keeping in mind the diverse stake-holders engaged in running these institutions.
  • The JSS can play an important role in bridging information asymmetry between skill training and market opportunities thereby giving an impetus to the creation of a workforce equipped in technology-driven skills, including in areas like health & wellness, tourism, e-commerce, retail and trade.
  • By aligning JSSs to the National Skill Framework, the government aims to provide standardised training across sectors.
  • This is an important step towards the convergence of all skilling activities under the aegis of one ministry, bringing in transparency and accountability to the entire skilling ecosystem.
  • Out of the 247 active JSSs, we already have 43 JSSs established across 42 Aspirational Districts identified by NITI Aayog.
  • A few more in the LWE (left-wing extremism affected) regions will be soon introduced to promote skill development of the youth in the region and help them connect back into mainstream economy.

Conclusion:

JSS has the potential to boost skill training and entrepreneurship in the remotest corners of the country. It can further strengthen the skills ecosystem benefiting those in the underprivileged sections of society.


Topic: Issues relating to development and management of Social Sector/Services relating to Health,

3) “Food-borne diseases is an increasing threat to human health which impede socio-economic development by straining health care systems and harming national economies, tourism and trade”. Critically analyse the statement.(250 words)

The hindu

 

Why this question:

According to World Health Organization (WHO), an estimated 600 million cases of food-borne diseases occur annually around the world.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must evaluate in detail the current scenario of food borne diseases, analyse the impact of the same human health.

Directive word:

Critically analyzeWhen asked to analyze, you  have to examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them as a whole in a summary. When ‘critically’ is suffixed or prefixed to a directive, one needs to look at the good and bad of the topic and give a fair judgement.

Structure of the answer

Introduction:

In a few introductory lines bring out the significant points of the WHO findings.

Body:

Answers must discuss the following aspects:

  • Key findings in the report –
  • An estimated 600 million cases of food-borne diseases occur annually around the world. This translates into one in 10 people falling ill after eating contaminated food.
  • Children under 5 years of age carry 40% of the food-borne disease burden with 1,25,000 deaths every year.
  • Discuss in detail the impact of the above.
  • What needs to be done? What are the recommendations?

Conclusion –

Conclude with way forward that complying with global food standards, establishing effective regulatory food control systems, applying good agriculture practices and building capacities of consumers to make healthy food choices are some ways to ensure food safety.

Introduction:

The first-ever World Food Safety Day was celebrated on June 7. It was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in December 2018 in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization. The theme for 2019 is ‘Food safety, everyone’s business’. An estimated 600 million cases of food-borne diseases occur annually around the world. This translates into one in 10 people falling ill after eating contaminated food.

Body:

Food borne intoxications or food poisoning is caused by ingestion

  • Of toxicants found as toxins of certain plants or animals.
  • Toxin formed by microbes while they multiply in the foods or after entering the intestines.
  • Poisonous substances that may be intentionally or incidentally added to foods during production, processing, transportation or storage.

E.g.: Botulism, Shellfish poisoning, Staphylococcal poisoning, Salmonellosis, diarrhoea, Hepatitis-A etc.

State of food safety around the world:

  • Food safety is an increasing threat to human health.
  • According to WHO, Children under 5 years of age carry 40% of the food-borne disease burden with 1,25,000 deaths every year.
  • Unsafe food also hampers development in many low- and middle-income economies, which lose around US$ 95 billion in productivity associated with disability, illness, and premature death of the workers.

Challenges to food safety:

  • Adulteration: It remains the primary problem. It is widely prevalent in spices, grains, pulses, cereals, processed foods, readymade foods etc
  • Storage of food grains at public and private warehouses is kept improperly. These warehouses are breeding grounds of rodents which infect the foods.
  • Due to excessive use of Pesticides and Fertilizers in agriculture, inorganic compounds enter food chains through bio-magnification. It poses direct and immediate threats to health.
  • Unhygienic storage and processing of bird flesh at poultry farms
  • Unawareness of people regarding expired edible food items like mustard oil, beverages
  • Lack of sanitation and water security

Impacts:

Food borne diseases are the most wide spread health problem in our country. In addition to health consequences, economic cost of food borne diseases such as lost of man days, cost of treatment, loss of affected food articles, etc can be huge.

Measures needed:

  • Complying with global food standards.
  • Establishing effective regulatory food control systems, including emergency preparedness and response.
  • Providing access to clean water.
  • Applying good agriculture practices (terrestrial, aquatic, livestock, horticulture).
  • Strengthening the use of food safety management systems by food business operators
  • Building capacities of consumers to make healthy food choices are some ways in which governments, international organisations, scientists, the private sector and civil society
  • Food safety should be adequately incorporated in national disaster-management programmes and emergencies.
  • Awareness for checking expiry date of processed and edible food items
  • Social audit at public warehouses

Way forward:

Adopting the UN Guide to food safety:

  • Governments must ensure safe and nutritious food for all.
  • Agriculture and food producers need to adopt good practices.
  • Business operators must make sure food is safe.
  • All consumers have a right to safe, healthy and nutritious food.
  • Food safety is a shared responsibility.

Conclusion:

Safe, nutritious and sufficient food is a key to promoting health and ending hunger, which are two of the main aims of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).


Topic: Role of civil services in a democracy

5) Elaborate upon the specific challenges that the civil services face in a democracy also suggest what can be done to address such issues in detail. (250 words)

Governance by Lakshmikanth

Why this question:

The question is about discussing the challenges faced by civil servants.

Key demand of the question:

The question expects us to discuss the challenges faced by the civil servants.

Also suggest solutions as to how one can address these challenges.

Directive word:

Elaborate – Give a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the  particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Begin with brief on role of civil services in a democracy.

Body:

Discuss the specific challenges that the civil services face in a democracy like:

  • Civil servants fall prey to political forces under threat or bribes.
  • They indulge in nepotism.
  • They are alienated from the public.
  • Frequent transfers prevent any real work.
  • Political interference prevents people from working sincerely.

Then move on to explain how these challenges can be addressed.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

Civil services or Bureaucracy is an administrative body of officials whose roles are determined by written rules. It’s an impersonal system operating on the basis of calculable rules and staffed by full time appointed officials. Civil Services are the bedrock of public administration. Civil services have assumed more important role in democracy to ensure good governance, both in developing and developed countries.

Body:

Challenges faced by the civil servants:

  • Political interference: The first and foremost challenge is the dispute between the IAS officers and MP or MLA. The major reason is the difference in opinion, corruption, using public office for personal use and protection given to criminals and law breakers by the MP and MLA.
  • Lack of professionalism and poor capacity building leads to poor outcomes and redtapism.
  • Inefficient incentive systems that do not appreciate upright and outstanding civil servants but reward the corrupt and the incompetent
  • Outmoded rules and procedures that restrict the civil servant from performing effectively
  • Lack of adequate transparency and accountability procedures – there is also no safety for whistle blowers
  • Work overload: Over demand and casework overload are facts of life for many public servants.
  • Transfers: The transfer malaise is all-pervasive. Everything relies on the impulses of the minister and sometimes an honest to goodness necessity. Arbitrary and whimsical transfers leads to insecurity in tenures and thus impedes institutionalization
  • Lack of control: A lack of discretion over their work can leave the public servant frustrated when they can see what needs to be done but are prevented from doing it. Unnecessarily detailed procedures or interference from superiors — what is known as micro management — are both aspect of this challenge.
  • Silo working: Silo working is what happens when departments or organisations focus on protecting their own position and role rather than the needs of the people that they are working for. From the public servant’s point of view this makes it harder to get things done.
  • Lack of recognition: The problem of lack of recognition is not just about the public servant getting personal appreciation for good work well done but also systemic inconsistencies in promotion and empanelment. This leads to demotivation and discouragement.
  • Gradual erosion in values and ethics leading to corruption and systemic ills.

Measures to fight the challenges:

Skilled Bureaucracy: There is a need for development of new skill:

  • Develop Project/Programme  Management  skills to  implement  large  projects  in  a  timely  and cost effective manner.  This should also include commercial, legal and financial negotiation and contract management skills.
  • Digital Skills to be used for improved service delivery. There should be increased reliance on e-governance and mobile governance.
  • Capacity/Skill building  is  vital  for  lower  bureaucracy since  they  are  in  the front  line  of  the public service delivery.  There is a need to enhance both their professional and soft skills.

Converged  Bureaucracy  :  There  is  a  need  to  break  down  the  silos  within  Government  to unlock productivity and outcomes :

  • Need for   Horizontal   convergence   in   vertical   administration –Greater   thrust   should   be accorded   on   cross   departmental   working,   interdepartmental   engagements,   and   lateral communication among and within departments.
  • Shared services  model  may  be  adopted for  services  such  as  IT,  Finance,  procurement    So that there is no duplication in effort and cost.

Open  Bureaucracy  : A  culture of openness  needs  to be  cultivated  towards  new  ideas,  new challenges  and  innovation  to  bring  about  continues  transformation  for  better  service delivery.

  • Open Policy Formulation–may be undertaken through openness to new thinking or in the gathering of evidence &insight from external experts. Collaborative approaches to policy  making  by  taking  views  from  members  of  civil  society,  think  tanks,  Universities, other countries and states.
  • Social Media  for  Participatory  Governance–Social  media,  crowd  sourcing  and  open sourcing  can  be  powerful  tools  to  connect  with  people  and  promote  participatory governance.
  • Constantly engaging with the private sector –Culture of openness needs to be adopted for new forms of partnership with private sector.

Connected  Bureaucracy –There  is  a  need  for  the  Bureaucracy  to  be  connected  within  and globally to imbibe the best practice.

  • Understanding global best practices will help our bureaucracy to develop world class acumen.
  • Horizontal Connectivity between the State Departments. There is  a  need  for  the  State Government  departments  to  share  the  learning  and  best  practices  with  their  counterparts  in other states.
  • Improvement in Interdepartmental connectivity through Government process re-engineering, simplification of rules.

Better pay and good work conditions to keep the civil servants motivated and work better for the development of country.

Conclusion:

There is an urgent need for balanced development across the country. The  mechanics  of  good  governance  have  to  be replicated  and  adapted  throughout.  There is a need for a common and integrated action plan of Nation Building through an Effective Delivery  of  Public  Services  in  a  Transparent,  Accountable,  Citizen  Friendly,  Innovative,  High Quality, Cost effective and Timely manner.


Topic : Role of media and social networking sites in internal security challenges.

6) Historically, privacy was almost implicit, because it was hard to find and gather information. But in the digital world, we need to have more explicit rules. Discuss the need to control social media and the associated challenges.(250 words)

Livemint

Why this question:

The article discusses the recent US government’s decision to press ahead with an antitrust probe against Big Tech firms has drawn the clout of these companies into the spotlight again. Investigators will put Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Google to scrutiny in an effort to check if they have abused their market dominance to stifle competition and hurt consumers.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must evaluate the need for controlling social media and the methods to ensure privacy concerns are addressed. One must explain how things have evolved historically with coming of the social media.

Directive word:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

In a few introductory lines highlight the role of social media, the context of security involved along with it.

Body:

In brief discuss –

  • Discuss how Social media is omnipresent in our lives and has a huge bearing on society and individuals.
  • Explain that about 1.49 billion people on average log onto Facebook daily; every second, on average, around 6,000 tweets are tweeted on Twitter; and since its inception, over 40 billion photographs have been posted on Instagram. This is evidence of the huge presence of social media in our lives.
  • Discuss the need for putting a control on the social media, why is it necessary and urgent.
  • Explain what are the challenges involved , how to overcome them.

Conclusion:

Conclude with what needs to be done, suggest way forward.  

Introduction:

Social media plays an integral role in our lives today and has a huge bearing on society and individuals. Social media has revolutionized the way people communicate and socialize on the web. There is a positive effect on business, politics, socialization as well as some negative effects such as cyber-bullying, privacy, and fake news.

Body:

Recent developments:

  • The US government’s decision to press ahead with an antitrust probe against Big Tech firms has drawn the clout of these companies into the spotlight again.
  • Investigators will put Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Google to scrutiny in an effort to check if they have abused their market dominance to stifle competition and hurt consumers.
  • If such behaviour is proven, it would be unsettling, to say the least, given the widening use of social media and the privacy concerns it has thrown up.

Need to control social media due to rising privacy concerns:

  • Legitimate vs fake information:
    • Challenge is how you permit what is considered legitimate content and information, and at the same time disallow the plethora of fake information as well as threats and abuse conveyed through these platforms.
    • There are questions raised whether to ban the medium or platform or content.
    • Rumours triggering lynchings and riots, data snooping etc.
  • Data theft and identity crisis:
    • Data of millions are taken and used when only 270,000 people knowingly or unknowingly gave consent.
    • Individuals often share their data without being aware of it or understanding the implications of privacy terms and conditions.
    • Individuals do not have much control over the data they shared and personal data is considered as the new oil.
    • Individual users are increasingly viewed as legitimate targets for mining personal and metadata.
    • Such data can provide an intimate psychological profile including ideological preferences that together help campaign managers target communications and forecast voter behaviour.
  • Personal information collected:
    • Fundamental business model of social media companies like Facebook poses some serious concerns.
    • Their goal is to collect as much personal information on individuals as possible and then use this information to sell highly targeted advertising to companies.
    • Worldwide there is very little understanding of what exactly they collected, little regulation and little known about the consequences on democracy.
    • This level of data collection represents the concentration of enormous power in the hands of a single corporation. The Cambridge Analytica scandal has highlighted how this power can be used by a small group of people with an agenda to foster polarisation, radicalisation and undermine democratic elections.
  • Other privacy issues:
    • The tax authorities, for instance, have an eye out for lifestyles that may be disproportionate to declared sources of income.
    • Earlier this week, the US began asking visa applicants to submit details of their social media accounts.
    • The trolling of women has brought to the fore the disturbing reality of online violence and abuse women face in India.
    • Social media psychological profiles are being generated by tools designed to aid recruitment. Official scans by state agencies are on the rise, too.
  • Currently very difficult to control because:
    • The number of users using social media platforms and internet are ever increasing and volume of traffic is huge.
    • The monopolistic tendency of a social media platform is all the more pronounced for the simple reason that its utility depends on connectivity: People have virtually no choice but to use the network that links everybody else they’d like to interact with.

Measures needed:

  • Companies claim that they are merely distributing information. But the fact that they are near-monopoly distributors makes them public utilities and should subject them to more stringent regulation, aimed at preserving competition, innovation, and fair and open access.
  • Recent laws directed at social media have that changing in Germany, social networks could pay up to $60 million in fines if hate speech isn’t removed within 24 hours.
  • Social networks need to enhance their own governance, continue to refine the algorithms, use more “friction” like warnings and notifications for suspicious content expand human oversight, adjust advertising, and continue to share knowledge with other networks to reach those goals.
  • India needs to have a legal framework for data protection. It will create a vital and necessary framework against which rights and responsibilities can be articulated, and digressions thereof evaluated.
  • A proper data protection law with an effective enforcement mechanism would ensure recognition for India as a trustworthy global destination for data-based businesses and privacy-conscious consumers while also protecting the Right to Privacy of the people in India.
  • Cyber law provisions need to be revised as the current approach of the Indian law is very narrow.
  • International agreements form an important node in a web of solutions needed to address security and the rule of law in cyberspace. Given India’s vision of a Digital India and considering the surge in cybercrime, it would be beneficial for India to join Budapest Convention
  • Experts have pointed to the importance of aspects such as following basic cyber hygiene and a periodic review of the security facets of one’s profile on various web platforms, especially on social media, where users tend to share personal information.
  • When there are no legitimate security or public interest reasons, users should have the right to have their data destroyed.

Conclusion:

Social media is a tool for empowerment, especially for a country like India where 70% of the population is yet to get online and leverage the opportunities it has to offer. While social media is definitely facing the privacy challenges, it is also enabling communities to access their rights and voice their opinion. Thus, there is a need to regulate it to get the best out of it for socio-economic development of society.


Topic: Work culture, Quality of service delivery, emotional intelligence

7) “Emotional intelligence stands on the four pillars of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and relationship management”. Elucidate. (250 words)

Ethics by lexicon

Livemint

Why this question:

The article discusses in detail the importance of emotional intelligence at the work place.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must discuss why emotional intelligence is of prime importance at the workplace, how empathy can be more effective than anger at the professional level.

Directive word:

ElucidateGive a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

In a few introductory lines appreciate the need for Emotional intelligence at workplace.

Body:

  • Define – empathy and emotional intelligence
  • Discuss how emotional intelligence is necessary for the functioning at workplace, emotional intelligence as the ability to accurately perceive and manage your own emotions and understand and navigate those of others, thus enhancing your ability to influence, manage conflicts, lead others and build relationships.
  • Elucidate on the four pillars of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and relationship management.
  • Provide for a case study/example to conclude better.

Conclusion:

Conclude by re asserting significance of such virtues.

Introduction:

Emotional intelligence or EI is the ability to understand and manage your own emotions, and those of the people around you. Emotional intelligence is the ability to perceive emotions, to access and generate emotions so as to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional knowledge, and to reflectively regulate emotions so as to promote emotional and intellectual growth.

Body:

According to Daniel Goleman, an American psychologist who helped to popularize emotional intelligence, there are five key elements to it:

Self-awareness:

  • The ability to recognize and understand personal moods and emotions and drives, as well as their effect on others.
  • Hallmarks of self-awareness include self-confidence, realistic self-assessment, and a self-deprecating sense of humour.
  • Emotional awareness: This deals with knowledge of one’s emotions and their effects. People having this competency are more aware of their feelings and performance.
  • Accurate self-assessment: This involves being aware of one’s strengths and weaknesses. One is open to feedbacks, new viewpoints, etc.
  • Self-confidence: This relates to complete affirmation of one’s worth and abilities. They are usually more confident and are able to make sound decisions despite any uncertainties or pressures

Self-management:

  • Ability to control or redirect disruptive impulses and moods, and the propensity to suspend judgment and to think before acting. Hallmarks include trustworthiness and integrity; comfort with ambiguity; and openness to change.
  • Adaptability: This involves flexible attitude towards change. People with this competency find it easy to handle changing routines, multiple roles and even shifting priorities.
  • Innovativeness: This involves getting easy with and open to new information and ideas. People who possess this are able to gather new ideas from multiple sources, set challenging roles and are able to take calculated risks. They evolve original solutions to various problems.

Social Awareness:

  • The ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people. A skill in treating people according to their emotional reactions.
  • Empathy does not necessarily imply compassion. Empathy can be ‘used’ for compassionate or cruel behaviour. Serial killers who marry and kill many partners in a row tend to have great emphatic skills.
  • A passion to work for internal reasons that go beyond money and status -which are external rewards, – such as an inner vision of what is important in life, a joy in doing something, curiosity in learning, a flow that comes with being immersed in an activity

Relationship management:

  • Proficiency in managing relationships and building networks, and an ability to find common ground and build rapport.
  • Hallmarks of social skills include effectiveness in leading change, persuasiveness, and expertise building and leading teams.

Conclusion:

Governance in modern times is becoming increasing complex with affective components of behaviour having a major role to play. Intelligence quotient alone can’t solve majority of problems an administrator faces, use of emotional intelligence is a must for better public service delivery as well as redressal.